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Monday, July 31, 2017

Podiatrist's Top 10 Recommendations to Alleviating Foot Pain!


Podiatrist Top 10 Recommendations 
to Alleviate Foot Pain

The Basics


1. Stop Walking Barefoot. This is absolutely crucial! We are living longer and we are living on concrete floors. It's your feet versus the concrete and the concrete is going to win. Walking barefoot leads to arthritic joint changes, degenerative joint disease, stress fractures, tendonitis, and promotes knee, hip and lower back pain (to name a few). If you do not stop walking barefoot, the foot pain will never resolve.

2. Stop walking around the house wearing only socks. Socks offer only minimal cushioning and they offer zero protection for your joints against the ravages of time and concrete floors. Socks are great for sleeping in or wearing with excellent shoes, but not walking in. The best socks to get are microfiber socks or any man-made fiber socks, which are far superior to cotton socks. 

3. Stop wearing flip-flops. Wearing flip-flops is better than walking barefoot, but not much. Even the 'best' flip-flops aren't good enough for your feet as they do not have the added protection of having rearfoot strapping, which I will discuss later in this article. 

4. Stop wearing flimsy bedroom slippers. Flimsy is bad. Ninety percent of slippers are flimsy and they offer only minimal protection for your foot joints. The world is full of flimsy shoes and bedroom slippers because that is what sells and that is what people think they need, but what actually feels much more comfortable and is better for your foot is to have a solid, supportive shoe with a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole. Like a firm mattress that has a cushioned top cover for more comfort, the same idea works with shoes. You need a firm, rigid sole (for more protection and support for your foot) and then it needs a cushioned top. 

5. As a bedroom slipper, I've listed your best options below. The only time that you should be barefoot and standing is when you are in the shower. I would recommend that you get a cushioned shower mat to stand while in the shower. As soon as you get out of the shower (or bath), step onto a thick, cushioned rug and, right after you dry yourself, immediately put on your bedroom slippers. If you get up to go to the bathroom in the middle of the night, step down directly into your slippers and then stand up and go to the bathroom. At our office, we treat a great deal of injuries that are caused by people walking barefoot between the bed and the bathroom in the middle of the night. Wearing a good slipper will prevent injuries as well as prevent falls for geriatric patients. 



Crocs Specialist (with no vents)
Don't purchase the Specialist Crocs that have the vents as they aren't as good. Crocs don't work as well for patients who have narrow feet because they tend to be wide. If you order these online, you need to order the next size up as they only come in full sizes. For instance, if you wear a size 7.5, then order an 8. If you wear a size 8, then order a 9. If your toes are touching the end of the Croc, then they are too small. If they feel too big, then that is the correct size. Remember, you have to be able to slip into them without fussing with the rear foot strap because you are using them as a bedroom slipper. They are only meant to be worn to get you from the bed to the bathroom and while you are puttering around in the morning. Once you are ready for your day, put on better shoes, such as the New Balance choices listed below.

***




Fleece Crocs
The fleece Crocs are a great choice if you live in a cold environment or if your feet tend to be cold. If you have severe athlete's foot or sweaty feet, this may not be your best choice. 

***



Orthofeet Diabetic Slippers 
This is my favorite choice for geriatric patients because they can slip into it easily and it offers great stability. It only has minimal rearfoot control, but the sole is extremely supportive. If Crocs don't work for you, this is an excellent choice.  

***



Orthoheel Vionix Relax Slippers
This is another great choice for geriatric patients. It is easy to slip into and the sole is supportive and it has excellent arch support. 

***



Birkenstock Sandals
For patients who don't like to wear enclosed shoes, the Birkenstock sandal is a good choice. Also, if you have sweaty feet, hot feet or chronic athlete's foot infections, the Birkenstock sandals is an excellent choice.


6. Wear only excellent shoes! This doesn't mean that you have to spend a fortune on shoes. This only means that you have to know what you are looking for when shopping for new shoes. For a shoe to be good enough for your feet, they must meet these three criteria, which are listed below:

7. Only wear shoes that have a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole. This concept is counterintuitive, but extremely important. If you are wearing a shoe that is flimsy and flexible, then you are allowing too much motion through your foot joints, which causes joint damage such as osteoarthritis and degenerative joint changes as well as stress fractures, tendinitis, and mechanical strain. For example, if you are recovering from a Lisfranc's Injury and you have just gotten out of a below-the-knee walking boot, then the last thing you want to do is wear a flexible shoe that re-aggravates the injury. You have to continue to protect your foot with a thick, rigid sole that never allows motion through the injured joint. And, yes, that is for the rest of your life. 

8. Only wear shoes with a wide toe-box. Pointy-toed shoes cause constant pressure and irritation to the toes, which causes bunions, hammertoes, ingrown toenails, corns, Morton's Neuroma's, and joint damage. It is important that you wear shoes with a wide and preferably soft toe box.   

9. Only wear shoes with rearfoot control. The reason why flip-flops don't work for anyone is that, without rearfoot strapping, then you are forced to scrunch down your toes to stay in the flip-flop, which causes more mechanical strain on your tendons, ligaments, and joints. It also increases your risk of injury as well as strain to your knees, hips and lower back. 

10. Wear arch support. Even if you think that you don't need arch support, the analogy I use is that bridges have arches and engineers put struts under bridges to help decrease stress and strain. Unless you are one of the ten percent of people who cannot tolerate arch support, then I would recommend trying either custom-molded orthotics or at least an excellent over-the-counter insert. Talk to your podiatrist about getting orthotics. Also, most podiatrist offices carry excellent over-the-counter inserts that are much less expensive and quite effective. The over-the-counter insert I recommend is Powersteps, which I've listed below. 


Powerstep Inserts



Best Shoe Choices:


Women's New Balance 928
The NB 928 is an excellent choice for anyone with foot pain. I always recommend that you go to the New Balance store to try them on and get properly measured. Try to go shopping after 2pm when your foot is a little more swollen and ask the store personel to measure your feet. If there is any pressure on your toes, go up a half size or width. Before you purchase the shoe, double check and make sure that the forefoot sole is not bending or flexing! Ten percent of shoes can be defective, poorly made or broken. Do not buy any shoes that have a sole that is bending or flexing. It's a waste of time, money and it defeats the purpose.



Women's New Balance 1540
If the NB 928 is not to your liking, the NB 1540 is a great second choice. It's not as good as the NB 928, but it is still better than anything else that I've found in the stores.




Women's Hoka One One Stinson ATR
This is a great choice for anyone with plantar fasciitis as it has amazing extra cushioning for the foot. Be aware that the toe box tends to run narrow. 



Remember, if your foot hurts then follow up with your local podiatrist for x-rays and a full evaluation. Avoid surgery and pursue conservative treatment first. 

Have a great day!

Dr. Cathleen A. McCarthy 

:)








Saturday, June 17, 2017

Cole Haans ZeroGrand CrissCross - Podiatry Recommended Women's Sandal.

Cole Haan ZeroGrand Crisscross

Podiatry Recommended Women's Sandals


The Cole Haan ZeroGrand CrissCross is an excellent choice for many foot types. What makes the shoe so good is that it meets three of the four criteria for what you need in an excellent shoe. 

First, it has a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole, which helps to prevent the progression of bunions, hammertoes, osteoarthritis, and degenerative changes to joints and tendons. By wearing a rigid-soled shoe you are stopping motion through joints that would otherwise be painful. Less motion through foot joints means less pain, less inflammation, and less swelling. The concept is counterintuitive, but it works. 

Second, the sandal has a wide toebox that is crucial for prevention of bunions, hammertoes, corns, blisters and will even help to prevent ingrown toenails and toenail fungus. 

Third, the sandal has a strap for rearfoot control, which helps to prevent stress and strain on tendons, ligaments, and joints. When you wear flip flops or any shoes that don't have rearfoot control, you are forced to scrunch down your toes to stay in the shoe, which promotes hammertoes and also causes more strain on the knees, hips and lower back. 

The fourth thing required to have an excellent shoe is arch support. In my opinion, arch support is actually the least important part of a shoe. Don't get me wrong, having proper arch support is optimal, but it is more important to have a rigid-soled shoe, wide toebox and rearfoot control. 

This sandal is recommended for patients with:
*Hallux Limitus (limited motion through the 1st toe joint when you are not weight-bearing)
*Functional Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion through the 1st toe joint while you are weight-bearing) 
*Hallux Rigidus (no motion through the 1st toe joint)
*Mild Osteoarthritis 
*Mild to Moderate Bunions
*Hammertoes
*Ingrown Toenails
*Morton's Neuroma
*Plantar Plate Issues
*Metatarsalgia
*Tailor's Bunions
*Mild Tendonitis
*Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Recovered from previous Mild Lisfranc's Injuries 
*Mild Over-Pronation
*Mild to Moderate Hypermobility (Ligament Laxity)

This sandal is not recommended for patients with:
*Moderate to Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis (you need more cushioning)
*Diabetes
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage)
*Lymphedema
*Charcot Foot
*History of Foot Ulcerations
*Geriatrics
*Drop Foot

Check with you podiatrist if you have any of these conditions before you wear this sandal: 
*Moderate to Severe Osteoarthritis
*Rheumatoid Arthritis 
*Recovering from Moderate to Severe Lisfranc's Injuries
*Ankle Instability
*History of Posterior Tibial Tendonitis

For more information on proper shoe gear, please refer to my other articles on this blog:

Shoe recommendations for patients recovering from Lisfranc's Injuries.

My feet hurt! Top 10 things to do to alliviate foot pain today.



I hope that this was helpful!

Have a wonderful day,

Dr. Cathleen A. McCarthy

:)

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Nike Goadome - Podiatrist Recommended Boots for men with painful feet and ankles.

Nike Goadome

A fantastic boot for men with biomechanically challenged feet!




The Nike Goadome is a great choice for anyone with biomechanically challenged feet! This boot offers exceptional biomechanical control of the foot and ankle for many foot types, but it is not for everyone. 

What makes the Nike Goadome boot superior to most other boots is that it meets the four criteria that are needed for a shoe to be podiatry recommended:

1. It has a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole, which stops motion through any painful or compromised joints. Whether you are recovering from a foot or ankle injury or you have painful, arthritic joints - wearing shoes that do not allow motion through these joints immediately allows the foot to begin to calm down and heal. Less motion through painful foot joints translates into less pain, less inflammation, and less swelling, which allows for all-day comfort. Wearing shoes with a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole will also improve knee, hip, and lower back pain as well as slow the progression of many foot problems, including bunions and hammertoes. 

2. It has a wide toe box, which means that it will help slow or stop the progression of bunions, hammertoes, corns, and ingrown toenails (to name a few!). Shoes that are tight in the toe box and put added pressure on toenails also promotes fungal toenail infections. In my experience, the only way you can get rid of toenail fungus is to always wear proper shoe gear that meets these four criteria for proper shoes. Microtrauma on toenails caused by flimsy shoes or tight toe boxes is one of the main contributing factors to getting a fungal toenail infection. We are surrounded by fungus and, once you injure the toenail, that is how the fungus gets into the nail and sets up an active infection. For more information on toenail fungus, please refer to my article:

3. It has Rearfoot Control. The Nike Goadome has amazing rearfoot control because it not only biomechanically controls the rearfoot, but it also controls the ankle. Less motion through the rearfoot means that there is less mechanical strain on tendons, joints, and ligaments. If you are recovering from an ankle injury, PT Tendonitis, or Peroneal tendonitis - this should be a great boot choice for you. 

4. It will accommodate Arch Support. The Nike Goadome has a removable insole so that it can be replaced by your full-length custom-molded orthotic or an excellent over-the-counter insole like Powerstep, which can be purchased online. Your local Podiatrist will have excellent insole options, such as heat-molded insoles or other over-the-counter products. Our office staff checks our patient's insurance coverage to see if custom-molded inserts are covered under their plan. If they are covered, our doctors cast the patients. If they are not covered, then we advise the patient to bring in their shoes, so they can try on our over-the-counter Footstep insole, which is an excellent alternative for people on a budget. Arch support helps with knee, hip and lower back pain as well as foot and ankle issues such as over-pronation (flat feet), tendonitis and joint pain. 

The Nike Goadome boot is recommended for patients with:
*Hallux Rigidus (no motion through 1st toe joint)
*Hallux Limitus (limited motion through 1st toe joint)
*Functional Hallux Limitus (limited motion through 1st toe joint when you are functioning)
*Osteoarthritis
*Plantar Fasciitis (heel pain)
*Degenerative Joint Disease
*Metatarsalgia
*Morton's Neuroma (the toe box has to feel roomy and cannot be a tight fit on your foot)
*Mild to Moderate Bunions 
*Mild to Moderate Hammertoes
*Mild to Severe Over-Pronation
*Ankle Instability
*Posterior Tibial Tendonitis (wear with arch support)
*Peroneal Tendonitis 
*Hypermobility
*Ligament Laxity
*Ehler Danlos Syndrome
*Marfan's Syndrome
*Recovering from a Lisfranc's Injury (fracture or sprain)
*Recovering from an Ankle Injury (fracture or sprain)
*Drop Foot in someone who is under 65 years of age (maybe)
*Achilles Tendonitis (maybe)
*Mild to possibly a Moderate Haglund's Deformity (maybe)
*History of Stress Fractures
*History of Tendon Injuries  
*Any foot joints that have been surgically fused

The Nike Goadome boot is not recommended for patients with:
*Excessive swelling
*Muscle or leg weakness 
*Charcot foot
*History of Ulcerations
*Peripheral Neuropathy 
*Peripheral Arterial Disease
*Anyone who is elderly or frail
*Severe Bunions 
*Severe Hammertoes
*Drop Foot in anyone who is over 65 years old. (Talk to your podiatrist about a drop-foot plate or AFO, which is a custom-molded foot-ankle orthosis, which is covered by Medicare and can be worn with a New Balance 928 or 1540).

Check with your podiatrist to see if this boot is appropriate for you if you have:
*Diabetes
*Rheumatoid Arthritis 

*If you have someone in your life who only wears sturdy boots and refuses to wear any other type of shoes - this person has what I call 'biomechanically challenged' feet. Whenever a kid or teenager comes into my office wearing heavy boots, I know that that kid has figured out that if he/she wears only boots that allow no motion through their foot or ankle joints - then they will be comfortable. If you know someone like this - or it is you - I highly recommend that you see a podiatrist and invest in a pair of custom-molded orthotics. 

Thank you for reading the blog and I would love it if you could share it with any biomechanically challenged loved ones in your life. 

Due to time constraints, I have not been able to keep up with answering all of your comments and questions, but these articles below will most likely answer any questions that you have about proper shoe gear. 

My Feet Hurt! Top 10 things to do to alleviate foot pain today.

Shoe recommendations for patients recovering from Lisfranc's Injuries.


Shoe recommendations for broken toes and how to properly treat a broken toe.


I hope this was helpful!

Dr. Cathleen A. McCarthy

:)




Monday, February 27, 2017

Women's Comfort Dress Shoe - Podiatrist Approved.


Born Lezlie

A great choice for all day comfort!



The Born Lezlie is my new go-to all day comfort shoe for work. I use a heat-molded, thin orthotic for better arch support and I am astonished that this shoe is more comfortable than my Dansko Professional clogs. 

What makes this shoe so great is that it meets three of the four criteria that a shoe must have to be good for your feet and to be comfortable. 

The four criteria that a shoe must have to be podiatry approved are:
1. Thick, rigid, and non-flexible sole. 
2. Wide toebox.
3. Rearfoot control. 
4. Arch Support. 

The Born Lezlie has a thick, rigid, and non-flexible sole that is crucial for protecting your foot joints. If you are wearing a shoe with a flimsy sole that allows motion through painful or challenged joints, then that excessive motion will promote the formation of bunions, hammertoes, and osteoarthritic joint changes. It also can increase strain on ankles, knees, hips, and the lower back. Wearing shoes with flexible soles causes increased motion through foot joints, which can cause increased pain, inflammation, and swelling. 

The Born Lezlie has a wide(ish) toe box that will work for most people who have mild to moderate bunions and hammertoes. The rearfoot control, as well as the added benefit of midfoot strapping, is excellent for improved biomechanical control of the foot joints.  

The Born Lezlie is recommended for people with:

  • Plantar Fasciitis (heel pain)
  • Mild to Moderate Bunions
  • Mild to Moderate Hammertoes
  • Mild Morton's Neuroma
  • Mild Metatarsalgia
  • Mild to Moderate Hallux Limitus
  • Mild to Moderate Functional Hallux Limitus 
  • Possibly Hallux Rigidus (try it on in the store to ensure that it works for you)
  • Surgically fused 1st Toe Joint (because the toe is typically fused at 15 degrees of dorsiflexion - this shoe should work)
  • Capsulitis
  • Mild Osteoarthritis 
  • Mild Rheumatoid Arthritis (check with your Rheumatologist)
  • Healed Lisfranc's Injury (check with your podiatrist) 
  • Mild Tendonitis
  • Mild Achilles Tendonitis
  • Mild Over-Pronation (try to wear with a dress orthotic or heat-molded insert, which you can typically get from your podiatrist)
  • Mild Tailor's Bunions
  • Mild Corns & Calluses


The Born Lezlie is not recommended for people with: 

  • Diabetes
  • History of Ulcerations
  • Peripheral Neuropathy (nerve damage)
  • Peripheral Arterial Disease (poor circulation)
  • Charcot Foot
  • Excessive Swelling
  • Lymphedema
  • Severe Over-Pronation
  • Severe Ligament Laxity / Hypermobility
  • Drop Foot
  • Balance Issues
  • History of Falling 
  • Severe Bunions
  • Severe Hammertoes
  • Severe Tailor's Bunions


For more information on proper shoes, please check out my other articles on this blog:

Shoe recommendations for patients recovering from Lisfranc's injuries:
http://podiatryshoereview.blogspot.com/2012/04/podiatrist-shoe-recommendations-for.html

My feet hurt! Top 10 things to do to alleviate foot pain today.
http://podiatryshoereview.blogspot.com/2012/05/my-feet-hurt-top-ten-things-relieve.html



I hope this was helpful!

Dr. Cathleen A. McCarthy

:)










Sunday, January 8, 2017

John Fleuvog Chief - Podiatry Recommended Men's Shoe.

John Fluevog Chief
Podiatry Recommended Men's Shoe.

The John Fluevog Chief if a great choice for stylish all day comfort. I gave my husband these shoes and he loves them. They are surprisingly diverse as far as dressing up jeans or wearing as a casual dress shoe to work. Well, at least in Arizona, this passes for a dress shoe! 

This shoe meets the four criteria required that a shoe must have to be comfortable:
1. It has a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole so that there is more protection for the foot joints. 
2. It has a wide toebox, so there is less pressure on the toes, which helps to prevent the progression of bunions, hammertoes, ingrown toenails, and corns. 
3. It has rearfoot control, which helps decrease mechanical strain to tendons and ligaments as well as to the joints of the knees, hips, and lower back. 
4. The insole is removable so that you can put in your custom-molded orthotic for better arch support. It can also accommodate a dress orthotic or a heat-molded insert which goes on top of the insole that comes with the shoe. 

Remember, the most important feature of finding a comfortable shoe is to find shoes that have a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole. No motion through the bottom of the foot means less inflammation, less swelling and less pain, which is crucial for all day comfort. 

This shoe is recommended for patients with:
*Plantar Fasciitis (heel pain)
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Hallux Limitus (limited motion through the 1st toe joint)
*Hallux Rigidus (no motion through the 1st toe joint)
*Functional Hallux Limitus (limited motion through the 1st toe joint while you are functioning)
*Morton's Neuroma (make sure you have plenty of room in the toe box) 
*Metatarsalgia
*Mild to Moderate Bunions
*Mild to Moderate Hammertoes
*Capsulitis
*Sesamoiditis
*Ingrown Toenails
*Corns & Calluses
*Mild to Moderate Tailor's Bunions
*Recovering from a previous Lisfranc's Injury (check with your podiatrist) 
*Osteoarthritis 
*Mild Rheumatoid Arthritis


This shoe is not recommended for patients with:
*Diabetes (check with your Podiatrist)
*History of previous foot ulcerations
*Peripheral Neuropathy (nerve damage)
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (poor circulation) 
*Charcot Foot
*Drop Foot 

I've been having trouble keeping up with answering individual questions posted on the blog, but these two articles should answer most questions that you have about proper shoes. 

For more information on proper shoes, please refer to my other articles: 
Shoe recommendations for patients recovering from Lisfranc's Injuries.

My feet hurt! Top 10 things to do to relieve foot pain today.



I hope this was helpful!

Dr. Cathleen A. McCarthy

:)


Saturday, January 7, 2017

Eileen Fisher Chelsea Boot - Podiatrist Approved for Certain Foot Types.

Eileen Fisher Chelsea Boot
A Great Choice For Style & All Day Comfort.





Eileen Fisher is a very smart lady when it comes to designing comfortable and stylish shoes! What makes her shoes so exceptional are that they usually meet the four criteria that a shoe must have to be comfortable. 

Her Chelsea boot has a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole, which is absolutely crucial for protecting foot joints. If you are wearing shoes that have a flexible sole, then you are forcing too much motion through joints that may not be able to handle it because of previous injury, mechanical strain or arthritic changes. A shoe sole that is thick, rigid and non-flexible stops motion through foot joints, which decreases inflammation, pain, swelling and arthritic changes. Motion through foot joints promotes foot issues such as bunions, hammertoes, corns, ingrown toenails and can be the cause of everything from stress fractures, metatarsalgia, neuromas, and degenerative joint disease. Flexible-soled shoes can also cause more knee, hip, and lower back strain. It's like building a house - if you want a healthy roof, you better have a good foundation. If you want to have healthy knees, hips and less lower back strain, you need to create a solid, sturdy foundation for your skeletal frame by wearing shoes that have a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole. 

Secondly, your shoes should have a wide toebox. Shoes with tight toe boxes promote hammertoes, bunions, corns, Morton's Neuromas, and can make it impossible to get rid of fungal toenails. In fact, the only way I am able to get rid of fungal nail infections is getting the patient to wear better shoegear. Pressure on the toenails from tight shoes causes microtrauma to the toenail, which allows fungus to enter the toenail and spread the infection to other nails. 

A shoe also must have rearfoot control. If there is no rearfoot control or no strap around the back of the heel, then your tendons, muscles and joints have to work harder to stay in the shoe, which causes mechanical strain, tired leg syndrome and can make you more prone to injuries, particularly in the rearfoot and ankle. Not having rearfoot control can also cause more strain on the knees, hips, and lower back. 

The fourth component, which is arch support, is actually the least important factor. It is more important to have an excellent shoe with a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole, wide toebox, and rearfoot control. Of course, it is optimal to wear excellent arch support, but it is better to have an excellent shoe with no arch support or an excellent shoe with a decent over-the-counter arch support than to be wearing a flexible-soled shoe with custom-molded orthotics. I am probably one of the few Podiatrists who believes this, but in my experience - the sole of the shoe is controlling 100% of the foot joints while the orthotic is only controlling the rearfoot and the midfoot (because the front of the orthotic is only a topcover that is flexible). The forefoot area must be controlled by the sole of the shoe. Custom molded orthotics generally cost $400, so I tell my patients to spend that money on excellent shoes and we can put them in an excellent over-the-counter insert for $50 or a heat-molded insert for dress shoes for $75. In my opinion, the power is in the shoe!

The Eileen Fisher Chelsea Boot is recommended for patients with:
*Mild Bunions
*Mild Hammertoes
*Metatarsalgia
*Mild Morton's Neuroma 
*Hallux Limitus
*Functional Hallux Limitus 
*Hallux Rigidus
*Previous Lisfranc's Joint Injury 
*Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Pain)
*Mild Achilles Tendonitis
*Mild Posterior Tibial Tendonitis (wear with a heat molded or dress orthotic if possible)
*Mild Peroneal Tendonitis 
*Mild Arthritis
*Mild Rheumatoid Arthritis
*Mild to Moderate Over-Pronation (wear with orthotic if possible)

The Eileen Fischer Chelesa Boot is not recommended for patients with:
*Charcot Foot
*History of Foot Ulcerations
*Excessive Swelling
*Severe Bunions
*Severe Hammertoes
*High Insteps
*Bone Spurs on the top of the mid-foot area

If you have any of these conditions, check with your Podiatrist to see if the Chelsea boot is appropriate for you:
*Peripheral Neuropathy (Nerve Damage)
*Diabetes 
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (Poor Circulation)
*Mild Foot Drop


For more information on proper shoes, check out these articles from my blog:

Shoe recommendations for patients recovering from Lisfranc's Injuries. 

My Feet Hurt! Top 10 things to relieve foot pain today.


I hope this was helpful!

Sincerely,

Dr. Cathleen A. McCarthy

:)




Monday, November 7, 2016

Podiatrist Recommended Trail Running Shoe - Salomon XA Pro.

Salomon XA PRO 3D CS WP 

Trail-Running Shoes



The Salomon XA Pro is an excellent trail running shoe. I'm not a trail runner, so I have been wearing this shoe for hiking, exercising at the gym and as a general walking shoe. I also like the fact that it is waterproof and has excellent gripping action on the bottom of the sole, which helps with hiking and running on rocky trails. 

What makes this shoe so good is that it meets the four criteria that a shoe must have to be comfortable:

1. A thick, rigid, non-flexible sole. It is crucial that shoes have a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole because less motion and flexing through foot joints allows for less inflammation, less damage, and less pain. If you are recovering from a foot fracture or injury, it is important that you protect those bones and joints with a thick, rigid and non-flexible sole, so that you don't reinjure your foot. 

2. Wide toebox. It's important to wear a shoe with a wide and preferably soft toe box so that there is less pressure on toes, which will stop or slow the progression of bunions, hammertoes, corns, and calluses.

3. Rearfoot control. Rearfoot control is important because it helps to biomechanically control the rearfoot, which means that there is less mechanical strain to tendons, ligaments, and joints. It also helps to decrease tired leg syndrome as well as decrease knee, hip and lower back strain. 

4. Arch support. Not everyone needs arch support. In fact, about ten percent of patients cannot tolerate arch support. The other ninety percent of patients do benefit from arch support, which helps to place the foot in a biomechanically, neutral position. Doing this helps to stop or slow the progression of forefoot issues such as bunions and hammertoes. It also is important if you are recovering from any foot or ankle injuries, particularly a Lisfranc joint injury. Arch support also helps with knee, hip and lower back pain.  

This shoe is recommended for people with:
*Plantar Fasciitis (heel pain)
*Metatarsalgia
*Morton's Neuroma
*Capsulitis
*Hallux Rigidus (no motion through the 1st toe joint)
*Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion through the 1st toe joint with no weight bearing)
*Functional Hallux Limitus (limited range of motion through the 1st toe joint while weight bearing)
*Bunions
*Hammertoes
*Achilles Tendonitis 
*Peroneal & Posterior Tibial Tendonitis
*Previous Lisfranc's Injury (check with your podiatrist if needed)
*Corns & Calluses
*Sesamoiditis
*Ingrown toenails
*History of Ankle Sprains
*Hypermobility
*Ligament Laxity
*Over-Pronation
*Pes Cavus (high arches)
*Pes Planus (flat feet)


Check with your podiatrist to see if this shoe is right for you if you have:
*Diabetes
*Peripheral Neuropathy (nerve damage)
*Peripheral Arterial Disease (poor circulation)
*Drop Foot
*Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease


This shoe is not recommended for people with:
*Charcot Foot
*History of Ulcerations
*Lymphedema (excessive swelling) 


For more information on proper shoes, check out these articles from my blog:

Shoe recommendations for patients recovering from Lisfranc's Injuries.


My feet hurt! Top 10 things to relieve foot pain today.



I hope this was helpful!

Dr. Cathleen A. McCarthy

:)